Shared-Use Mobility Center https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org Collaborating to advance transportation policy and practice Wed, 11 Sep 2019 22:26:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Mobility Hub Newsletter: September 11, 2019 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/mobility-hub-newsletter-september-11-2019/ Wed, 11 Sep 2019 16:11:33 +0000 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/?p=9441 The post Mobility Hub Newsletter: September 11, 2019 appeared first on Shared-Use Mobility Center.

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Welcome to the Shared-Use Mobility Center’s weekly guide to the most impactful news, thought-provoking articles and innovative technologies that are shaping our transportation future. We believe in sharing information, just like sharing cars, bikes, and scooters, so if there’s anything additional you’d like to see, just drop us a line.

Announcements

NEW SUMC Webinar: Microtransit & Public-Private Partnerships
September 24, 2019 | 1:00 to 2:30 CDT

Transit agencies and cities are looking toward public-private partnerships as a potential solution to provide transit connections where fixed-route transit may not be feasible given density, connectivity, or other land-use considerations. This webinar will explore four public-private partnerships across the U.S. that have used microtransit and partnerships with transportation network companies to meet various needs within their communities. Presenters include SUMC, King County Metro, Sound Transit, the Cities of Newton, Massachusetts, Grand Rapids, Michigan, and Arlington, Texas, and Via.

Remembering 9.11.01


Ridehailing/Carsharing/Carpooling

Even with kid-focused ridehail startups, teens find themselves looking to Uber and Lyft for solo rides after school, even if it isn’t exactly legal. New data from debit card company Current shows that transactions made to these companies combined follow Apple as the second-highest recipient of teen spending.

A new study from the University of Washington Urban Freight Lab shows how adding more passenger load zones in certain parts of bustling Seattle decreased double-parking issues and traffic mishaps, making pickups and dropoffs 42 seconds faster than the average time.

Don’t have a phone? If you’re at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport, you can book an Uber on dedicated kiosks.

Ridehail to your carshare? Lyft now offers a carshare-rental hybrid service that will give you $40 in ride credit to get to and from the car location.

Partnerships and Programs

Energy company Dominion Energy will help Virginia roll out 50 electric school buses in the company’s service areas as part of an initial launch in the state, with plans to have 1,000 EV buses on the road by 2025.

Shelby County, TN Mayor Lee Harris announced a proposed measure that would create more funding for the Memphis Area Transit Authority through a flat-rate fee for households that registers “third and additional” vehicles in a move to cut traffic congestion and emissions.

London will have the largest electric bus fleet in Europe following the city’s announcement to fully electrify two double-decker bus routes. Great work Transport for London!

A new framework out of the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations aims to guide autonomous vehicle priorities to help the United Nations on self-driving car development while ensuring safety and compliance on roads.

Bikesharing and Micromobility

Chicago’s Divvy bikeshare is working with local organizations to help build bike education and job training in the area for young Chicagoans and students.Strong, active mobility communities are always needed.

Spin will bring charging docks for its dockless scooters to DC and Northern Virginia to keep sidewalk clutter to a minimum. Let’s see if this catches on.

A report from research group INRIX found that around 50% of trips under three miles in 10 major US metros could be replaced by micromobility options like shared bikes and scooters, which would be a win for the environment and America’s serious congestion issues.

CityLab took a spin on Revel’s shared moped service to see how the electric, two-wheeled fleet stands against the dockless scooter options around the District.

Transit

Transportation researcher Yonah Freemark takes a hard look at the long-term decline of transit ridership happening (mostly) all over the US and how it compares to the experience in French cities.

Fresh off the IndyGo BRT Redline launch, people are excited to have finally reached an integral goal in revitalizing transit use in Indianapolis but the question remains: what about the rest of Central Indiana?

The FTA has approved a workable plan for Honolulu’s proposed 20-mile rail line, making way for the city to receive $744 million through a grant funding agreement for the project.

APTA has a new report on the transportation needs of late-shift workers and how transit agencies, employers, and local governments are consolidating efforts “to help this often-overlooked constituency of transit riders.” Read more on Curbed.

Technology

Microsoft wants to help self-driving car manufacturers and startups develop autonomous driving systems with its existing Connected Vehicle Program and new driverless vehicle program.

TomTom is ramping up it’s autonomous vehicle testing with its updated HD mapping and self-driving test car.

GetThereATX.com is a new trip-planning and information website for the Austin, TX region that brings educational resources, mobility options, and user-specific solutions to help locals and visitors get around the city.

Daimler is showing no signs in slowing down its self-driving freight truck endeavors and now the company is testing Level 4 autonomous big rigs on public roads in Virginia.

Urban Sustainability

The Texas A&M Transportation Institute Urban Mobility Report, infamous for it’s focus on highways and roads, shows that congestion is getting worse even with commute times staying about the same. CityLab believes it’s the low density of sprawling cities is the root of it all.

The Chicago Department of Transportation has potential plans for more bike lanes in the city’s Far South side where bikeways are sparce. Local bike advocacy groups are rallying behind the cause with full support.

Architect David Ross Scheer heralds the benefits of high-density development in Salt Lake City where walkability, sustainable living, and transit use could increase as long as good building design is considered.

Sustainable transit is booming in Latin American metros like Medellín and Santiago as bus ridership soars and electric bus fleets become a driving force.

Requests for Proposals, Qualifications, or Information

Notice of Rideshare Pilot Program
Pace Suburban Bus
Illinois
Deadline: October 1, 2019

RFP: 2021 Transportation Alternatives Program
Kansas Department of Transportation
Kansas
Deadline: November 1, 2019

RFP: Uber Mobility Research Grants Fund
Uber
Deadline: December 1, 2019

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Mobility Hub Newsletter: September 5, 2019 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/mobility-hub-newsletter-september-5-2019/ Thu, 05 Sep 2019 21:28:31 +0000 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/?p=9431 The post Mobility Hub Newsletter: September 5, 2019 appeared first on Shared-Use Mobility Center.

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Welcome to the Shared-Use Mobility Center’s weekly guide to the most impactful news, thought-provoking articles and innovative technologies that are shaping our transportation future. We believe in sharing information, just like sharing cars, bikes, and scooters, so if there’s anything additional you’d like to see, just drop us a line.

Announcements

Watch our Webinar about the Clean Mobility Options – Mobility Operator RFI.

The California Air Resources Board is in the process of launching the Clean Mobility Options program, which supports zero-emission carsharing, bikesharing, ridesharing, and other innovative mobility services in low-income and disadvantaged communities around the state. The Shared-Use Mobility Center and CALSTART are serving as Statewide Administrator of the program and issuing this Request For Information to create the program’s Mobility Provider Directory.

This webinar allows interested mobility operators to obtain information about program design and the development of a Mobility Provider Directory. RFI responses are due to the Statewide Administrator by Tuesday, September 17th,  so take a look and help to create the next generation of shared+electric mobility partnerships.

MOD Learning Center Bikesharing Double-Feature!
See how bikesharing is evolving in one of America’s largest cities and in your small town with our evaluation profile of free-floating bikeshare in Seattle and a brand new case study on rural bikeshare in Pocahontas, Iowa.

Meet, Mingle, and Toast Mobility at SUMC’s NACTO Reception
—almost sold out!

Tues, Sept 10 | 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm | The Fifth Social Club, Toronto


Ridehailing/Carsharing/Carpooling

VIDEO: Learn about ridehailing’s beginnings, its impact on VMT and “empty-seat inefficiency”, the role of data, and driver wages—all in hand-drawn illustrations. Watch on YouTube.

New research on data collected from a sample of 14,756 fares by Jalopnikshows that Uber and Lyft’s take rate, the cut they receive from driver trips, is anywhere between 8.5-10% percent higher than the companies’ reported figures.

Zum, the ridehailing service for kids aimed at helping parents manage busy after-school schedules, has expanded into six major US metros including Chicago and DC.

Floridians that are evacuating to local shelters in areas affected by Hurricane Dorian can get two free rides up to $20 each way from Uber and Lyft.

Partnerships and Programs

Caltrans will be awarding over $34 million in 2020 to transportation planning projects focused on growing sustainable communities by reducing transportation-related emissions.

Lyft, the Philadelphia Housing Authority, and Uplift Solutions are partnering to help families living in “food deserts” access healthy grocery options with subsidized ridehailing trips around public housing communities.

The Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority will use $125 million of allocated funds from the FTA to expand BART light rail as part of a six-mile, four-station extension.

The Ann Arbor Area Transportation Authority has replaced two underutilized bus routes with its on-demand FlexRide shuttle service after seeing steady growth in Ypsilanti Township since 2017.

Bikesharing and Micromobility

For seven years, George Washington University students advocated to use the discounted Capital Bikeshare memberships that are available to university faculty and staff. Thanks to the District DOT, now they’re open to all students at DC-based universities.

What can be done to make dockless scooters safer to ride on LA streets? Officials are attempting to enforce pricey violation tickets to users who ride on the sidewalk but this approach is neglecting a more useful solution: protected bike/scooter lanes.

AUDIO: Hear Recode chat with Lime president Joe Kraus about the company’s ride through the bursting scooter scene and how to see and seize opportunities to keep people on two wheels and out of cars.

Infrastructure around schools plays an important role in encouraging students to walk or bike to class—and this helps to decrease surrounding traffic, increase pedestrian safety, and promote healthy and active lifestyles.

Transit

After Kansas City decided to make their streetcar gratis, the city is now considering making the entire KCATA transit system free as well to make it easier for everyone to afford to ride the bus.

Congrats to Phoenix voters for voting no on Proposition 105 which aimed to block light rail development in the city’s South side.

Detroit transit riders now have an app, from the people over at fare software company Passport, that allows them to buy multi-use passes for fixed-route buses and the Q-line streetcar.

Transportation in cities has been planned and built specifically around men for years, leaving women to use streets that may feel dangerous or uncomfortable. Streetsblog looks at several places that have maintained the gender gap in mobility.

Technology

Take a trip and choose your shared mobility options with Google Maps’ new multimodal feature that combines ridehailing or cycling as first/last mile options for transit directions in multiple US cities.

To keep people out of bike lanes and bring justice to drivers blocking them, a San Francisco-based designer/engineer built the app Safe Lanes to give citizens the power to report offenders and help keep the streets safer for cyclists.

Didi, the ridehailing giant of the East, will be piloting an autonomous vehicle ridehailing service in Shanghai, which will include up to 30 different models of level 4 autonomy.

Pigeon, the crowdsourced app for New York transit updates, now includes more than just city rail, with buses, commuter rail, and ferries rounding out the shared mobility options.

Urban Sustainability

What would happen if every American driver cut about 1,350 miles per year (about 10%) from their road mileage? An effect similar to “taking about 28 coal-fired power plants offline for a year.”

Idea: instead of viewing scooters as an obtrusive nuisance, how about viewing them as one of several intermediate modes of travel (vehicles that go between 10-15 mph) that give people more mobility options and first/last-mile connections from transit. All they need is a little street space.

Many of the Democratic candidates for the 2020 US election have laid out trillion-dollar plans to combat the effects of climate change, with Bernie Sanders’ Green New Deal being the most comprehensive. One blind spot remains even with the inclusion of school bus electrification and modernizing transit: our destructive car dependence.

A new book from Gehl creative director David Sim looks at the aspects of interconnected, mixed-use “soft cities” that are planned around public interactions and social connections, making quality of life a focus when bringing together amenities for more “layered” and integrated spaces.

VIDEO: Check out Vox’s video on the sameness of the ‘burbs and how many era-altering factors from the mid century, such as the auto industry and federal financing, created the Stepford neighborhood that’s still prevalent today.

Requests for Proposals, Qualifications, or Information

RFQ: Citywide Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan
City of Mount Vernon
Mount Vernon, New York
Deadline: September 27, 2019

RFP: 2021 Transportation Alternatives Program
Kansas Department of Transportation
Kansas
Deadline: November 1, 2019

RFP: Uber Mobility Research Grants Fund
Uber
Deadline: December 1, 2019

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Mobility Hub Newsletter: August 29, 2019 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/mobility-hub-newsletter-august-29-2019/ Thu, 29 Aug 2019 17:50:19 +0000 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/?p=9387 The post Mobility Hub Newsletter: August 29, 2019 appeared first on Shared-Use Mobility Center.

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Welcome to the Shared-Use Mobility Center’s weekly guide to the most impactful news, thought-provoking articles and innovative technologies that are shaping our transportation future. We believe in sharing information, just like sharing cars, bikes, and scooters, so if there’s anything additional you’d like to see, just drop us a line.

Announcements

Meet, Mingle, and Toast Mobility at SUMC’s NACTO Reception
—almost sold out!

Tues, Sept 10 | 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm | The Fifth Social Club, Toronto

If you’re going to NACTO’s Designing Cities 2019 Conference or will be in the Toronto area on September 10th, join SUMC for our popular post-NACTO happy hour, sponsored by Populus and Bird. Connect with innovative city leaders, and shared mobility practitioners and partners. Complimentary beer, wine, and hors d’oeuvres will be served.

Request for Information: California Clean Mobility Options – Mobility Operators
California Air Resources Board, Shared-Use Mobility Center, CALSTART
Deadline: September 17, 2019

The California Air Resources Board (CARB) is in the process of launching Clean Mobility Options for Disadvantaged Communities, a grantmaking and capacity-building program to support small-scale, zero-emission mobility services in low-income and disadvantaged communities around the State. SUMC and CALSTART are managing the program and issuing an RFI to obtain information in support of program design and the development of a Mobility Provider Directory. The RFI is intended for mobility operators who wish to partner with communities to build and operate mobility services. Questions regarding this RFI may be directed to RFI@cleanmobilityoptions.org.

An informational webinar will be held Tuesday, September 3rd at 10:00 am Pacific Daylight Time.  Please register here to participate in the webinar. 


Ridehailing/Carsharing/Carpooling

An EV carsharing pilot is coming to the rural area of Hood River, OR by way of the Clean Rural Shared Electric Mobility project as part of a collaboration between Portland mobility organization Forth, Honda, and Envoy Technologies.

In the UK, ridehail drivers are fighting for access to their data with companies like Uber to gain better control over the narrative surrounding their classification as full-time workers.

Forbes looks into the term “ridesharing” and how it’s evolved since TNCs were just starting out 10 years ago. “Ridepooling”, it offers, is a better term for on-demand rides that actually reduce vehicle-miles traveled and encourage more passengers in the same car.

Partnerships and Programs

A boon for the bus! Washington’s Pierce Transit was approved to receive $60 million from Sound Transit to build out a 14.4-mile BRT line from Tacoma to Spanaway.

The Michigan Economic Development Corp’s innovation arm PlanetM awarded over $450,000 to six companies to fund new transportation and technology projects across the state.

Waymo just launched a new Open Dataset portal containing 1,000 autonomous vehicle driving segments to encourage data sharing and support new research to improve self-driving tech. Way to go, Waymo.

Bikesharing and Micromobility

The dockless scooters that make up the new pilot program in Chicago are being used during the morning/evening rush hour period, about 70% of all e-scooter miles traveled, according to a new study by DePaul University’s Chaddick Institute for Metropolitan Development.

The Seattle Department of Transportation hopes to launch dockless scooters in the City by the first half of 2020. Scheduling a “public engagement period” is a good place to start.

Toronto will be getting its first scooter-sharing service in the coming weeks in the City’s Distillery District through Bird Canada, but there are hurdles to overcome before the new mobility trend gets a full rollout.

Will micromobility change transportation as we know it? Dataconomy looks at the corporate and startup partnerships that provide a glimpse into our (hopefully affordable, equitable, and accessible) multimodal future.

Transit

Via will be licensing its on-demand routing technology to the New York City Department of Education to help upgrade the yellow bus network for the city’s entire school system.

Elon Musk pegged the Singaporean government as “not supportive” of growing electric vehicle use in the city-state. Singapore’s Minister for the Environment shot back that the country doesn’t care about the private EV “lifestyle” as much as bringing “proper solutions that will address climate problems”, such as EV buses and taxis.

Eugene, OR has a new on-demand EV shuttle service (EmGo) as part of a new partnership between the Lane Transit District, Lane Council of Governments, and RideZero.

The Patriot Act with Hasan Minahj stated that “Everyone hates public transportation” while talking about the public’s general negative outlook on transit agencies’ through social media. Planetizen wants to remind you why it can be a joy for many to use and how it can strenthen social connections, help build communities and liberate you from the private car “bubble”.

Technology

New York City’s Taxi and Limousine Commission has a new TLC Data Hub tool that visualizes data from for-hire vehicles, yellow/green taxis, and other shared rides around the city.

Don’t forget the +1. Waze is upgrading its carpooling tech to allow drivers to pick up multiple riders for more shared commutes in the US, Brazil, Mexico, and Israel.

Miami-Dade Department of Transportation and Public Works and Cubic Transportation Systems have announced new digital payment integration for the EASY Card fare system that’s, well, easier. Riders can pay Metrorail fares at the gate using contactless-enabled bank cards and digital wallets.

Cities have been calling for more transparent data standards in hopes that private mobility operators join the movement for broader data sharing across the transportation industry. A few platforms and collectives are working to make that universal data hub for new mobility technology similar what GTFS did for transit data.

Urban Sustainability

New York’s Regional Plan Association is drafting up a bike “master plan” to create a complete and comprehensive framework for a five-borough, protected bike lane network in the region.

The ease of accessing transit (and other modes for that matter) is a major factor in reducing solo driving and getting more people on cleaner mobility options according to new research from the Institute of Theoretical Physics in Saclay, France.

A dilapidated and dead highway in Akron, OH called the Innerbelt is a ruin of divided neighborhoods and displaced residents that officials and planners hope to transform into a vibrant public park. Getting there, though, will take some work.

As the fastest growing mode of transportation, cycling is a force for the development of more densely populated communities that support sustainable, healthy living. We need to plan for and encourage bicycle-oriented development to keep the momentum going.

Requests for Proposals, Qualifications, or Information

RFI: California Clean Mobility Options – Mobility Operators
California Air Resources Board, Shared-Use Mobility Center, CALSTART
Deadline: September 17, 2019

RFI: Best Practices and Emerging Technologies in Shared Active Transportation
Connecticut Metropolitan Council of Governments and Greater Bridgeport Transit
Bridgeport, CT
Deadline: September 30, 2019

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Mobility Hub Newsletter: August 23, 2019 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/mobility-hub-newsletter-august-23-2019/ Fri, 23 Aug 2019 15:09:48 +0000 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/?p=9373 The post Mobility Hub Newsletter: August 23, 2019 appeared first on Shared-Use Mobility Center.

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Welcome to the Shared-Use Mobility Center’s weekly guide to the most impactful news, thought-provoking articles and innovative technologies that are shaping our transportation future. We believe in sharing information, just like sharing cars, bikes, and scooters, so if there’s anything additional you’d like to see, just drop us a line.

Announcements

Meet, Mingle, and Toast Mobility at SUMC’s NACTO reception.
The Shared-Use Mobility Center requests the pleasure of your company on Tuesday, September 10th from 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm for a fun post-NACTO happy hour at The Fifth Social Club in Toronto, sponsored by Populus and Bird. Complimentary beer, wine, and hors d’oeuvres will be served as you enjoy the chance to network with city leaders from across North America.

New Case Study in the MOD Learning Center:
A Google Transit Search of routes in Vermont for non-traditional rural transit users would often turn up empty. Thanks to the Go! Vermont Trip Planner, riders can now view alternate travel options which include both fixed and flexible public transit services. Go! Vermont! works on a computer or a smartphone and has increased trip-planning access from less than half of the geographical area of Vermont to nearly 100%.

View the Go Vermont! Case Study and learn how it works.


Ridehailing/Carsharing/Carpooling

Switch from Uber X to shared and you could be dropped off first. Uber’s new “Non-Stop Shared Ride” feature gives you ride credit so you get the desirable last seat in an Uber Pool.

RideOS is a new startup that wants to use open-source software to help anyone launch their own ridehailing platform, including ones with autonomous vehicles, and they have partnered with Voyage and HERE Technologies to make it happen.

Urban Land Institute offers a deep look into how cities are increasingly using carsharing programs to reduce parking for residential and commercial development in the US and how it has become a boon for shared mobility initiatives.

With internet access rapidly increasing around Cuba for the past several years, local entrepreneurs are taking a chance to bring ridehailing to Havana’s growing tech-savvy population with an app called Sube.

Partnerships and Programs

New Jersey is going all in on transit-oriented development with a slew of of mixed-use projects in the works to enhance quality of life and create better access to amenities.

Houston voters will have a chance this November to boost transit funding by $3.5 billion to ground a more multimodal metro region, which could include the result of another upcoming vote: better pedestrian and cycling infrastructure.

The Vermont Agency of Transportation has plans for a new transit program that will help residents in addiction recovery to have access to transportation around Rutland and the Northeast Kingdom, with help from the FTA.

A federal program called the Community Connect Grant wants to use $120 million over five years (from a new transportation bill) to restore neighborhoods that were split by the massive highway projects of “urban-renewal” of yore, potentially creating a streamlined fund to tear down old “highways to nowhere.”

Bikesharing and Micromobility

Equiticity founder Olatunji Oboi Reed dishes out his policy recommendations for Chicago’s Mayor Lightfoot on what can be done to ensure that the city’s mobility system, including dockless scooters on the West and Northwest sides, is “transformative, safe and secure for black and brown people.”

Now you’ll be seeing Limes, scooters that is, and their battery capacity, in more than 100 cities worldwide through Google Maps’ cycling and walking tabs when finding directions for short trips.

What can we do to make dockless scooters safer? Transportation advocate and Chicago columnist John Greenfield looks at the data around recent scooter injuries and how it shows the shortcomings (and potential safety fixes) of the new mobility poster child.

As San Antonio nears its choice to pick three vendors out of the six currently operating in the city, Bird and Lime’s independent contractors who charge scooters overnight for extra (or full-time) cash wonder: what will I do if they leave?

Transit

Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Secretary Leslie Richards sits down with Governing to discuss how she is trying to make waves towards more pedestrian and cyclist focus in the transportation sector and how PennDOT is creating more thoughtful transportation projects by understanding community impact.

Central Ohio Transit Authority ridership is booming after the agency launched a subsidized, unlimited-ride pass dubbed the C-pass, showing over 10% in growth for bus rides in one year.

Chicago’s River West neighborhood is starting to see more housing development in a move to catch up to the Northwest side’s more trendy Wicker Park and Logan Square areas. With Blue line improvements (which include adding more trains) still in the works, some wonder if it overcrowding will get worse before it gets better.

Bus-only lanes are a compelling alternative to high-cost rail projects in even moderately-dense areas. Watch how three buses filled with 210 people collectively fly past a whopping seven cars during a typical traffic crunch in a 7-second video. Good job LA Metro!

Technology

AUDIO: Dr. Johanna Zmud, the Senior Research Scientist at the Texas A&M Transportation Institute, sits down with the folks at the Mobility Podcast to weigh in on the factors that affect the social influence of autonomous vehiclesand how people may or may not come to accept the controversial and emerging technology.

Check out five myths about self-driving cars from the Washington Post that people just can’t shake, including how they will impact congestion, the environment, and our mobility habits.

Vancouver is expanding a pilot that uses artificial intelligence to improve predicted bus departures by 74%. This partnership is a collaborated effort with Microsoft and T4G, a software tech and analytics company.

Smart Columbus, Siemens Mobility, and Bytemark are teaming up to launch a trip-planning app that integrates “public and private mobility service to be paid using a single account-based payment system.”

Urban Sustainability

White flight, segregation, and a heavily racist past were major motivators in making Atlanta and the surrounding area highway, not transit, dependent. The fact that earlier this year, the predominantly white suburb of Gwinnett County still refused to join the region’s MARTA transit agency, says that this hateful legacy may not be in the past at all.

A new study shows that ridehailing trips contribute to rising congestion issues in many US metros but one quote from researchers puts this finding into perspective: “In total, approximately 2 to 3 percent of all VMT generated in Los Angeles County was generated by Lyft and Uber services in September 2018, while all other vehicle activity accounts for 97 to 98 percent of total VMT”.

Popular mid-century, the Thomas Guide was a 3,000-page atlas that mapped out 5,000 square miles of LA county. With its replacement by Google Maps and other navigation apps, Citylab asks if user-focused maps have made us egocentric wayfinders?

DC is ramping up its efforts to highlight sustainable transportation as a main metric for new real estate development with a set of new guidelines that confirm pedestrian safety and walkability in the evaluation process.

Requests for Proposals, Qualifications, or Information

RFP: Improving Access and Management of Transit ITS Data
TRB’s Transit Cooperative Research Program
Washington D.C.
Deadline: September 26, 2019

RFP: Accessible Mobility on Demand
Sound Transit
Seattle, Washington
Deadline: September 27, 2019

RFP: Transit District Development Opportunity
City of White Plains
White Plains, New York
Deadline: November 1, 2019

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Meet, Mingle, and Toast Mobility at SUMC’s NACTO Reception https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/meet-mingle-and-toast-mobility-at-sumcs-nacto-reception/ Thu, 22 Aug 2019 16:28:22 +0000 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/?p=9342 The post Meet, Mingle, and Toast Mobility at SUMC’s NACTO Reception appeared first on Shared-Use Mobility Center.

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What: SUMC’s NACTO reception
When: Tues, Sept 10 | 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Where: The Fifth Social Club @ 225 Richmond St West, Suite #100, Toronto, ON M5V 1W2

The Shared-Use Mobility Center requests the pleasure of your company on September 10th for a fun post-NACTO happy hour at The Fifth Social Club, sponsored by Populus and Bird. Advance the state of transportation in cities while connecting with innovative city leaders, the shared mobility industry, and technology partners. Complimentary beer, wine, and hors d’oeuvres will be served.

Getting There: The Fifth Social Club is 0.6 km (an 8-minute walk) from the NACTO venue at the Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel. Both the Sheraton and the Fifth Social Club are located next to multiple Bike Share Toronto stations.

Space is limited. Please RSVP by Thursday, September 5th.

If you have any questions, please reach out to Kimberly Steele at kimberly@sharedusemobilitycenter.org.

About the Shared-Use Mobility Center

The Shared-Use Mobility Center is a public-interest organization dedicated to achieving universal, affordable, and sustainable mobility throughout the US through the efficient sharing of transportation assets. Through piloting programs, conducting new research, and providing policy and technical expertise to cities and regions, SUMC seeks to extend the benefits of shared mobility for all.

About Populus

Populus is a platform that helps cities and private mobility providers deliver safe, equitable, and efficient streets through better data and analytics. Trusted by public agencies large and small, the Populus data platform integrates big data on shared services (carsharing, ridehailing, bikeshare and scooters) to monitor operator compliance and help cities make data-driven policy and planning decisions. Founded in 2017 by MIT and UC Berkeley transportation PhDs with over a decade of experience building software to simulate the future of cities, Populus is headquartered in San Francisco, CA. Learn more about their advanced solutions for cities at www.populus.ai

About Bird

Bird is a last-mile electric vehicle sharing company dedicated to bringing affordable, environmentally friendly transportation solutions to communities across the world. It provides a fleet of shared electric scooters that can be accessed via smartphone. Birds give people looking to take a short journey across town or down that “last-mile” from the subway or bus to their destination a way to do so that does not pollute the air or add to traffic. Bird works closely with the cities in which it operates so that Bird is a reliable and affordable transportation option for people who live and work there. Founded in 2017 by transportation pioneer Travis VanderZanden, Bird is headquartered in Venice, Calif., and is rapidly expanding across the world. Follow Bird on Instagram (www.instagram.com/bird), on Twitter at @BirdRide, and find more information at www.bird.co

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Mobility Hub Newsletter: August 15, 2019 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/mobility-hub-newsletter-august-15-2019/ Thu, 15 Aug 2019 17:26:42 +0000 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/?p=9335 The post Mobility Hub Newsletter: August 15, 2019 appeared first on Shared-Use Mobility Center.

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Welcome to the Shared-Use Mobility Center’s weekly guide to the most impactful news, thought-provoking articles and innovative technologies that are shaping our transportation future. We believe in sharing information, just like sharing cars, bikes, and scooters, so if there’s anything additional you’d like to see, just drop us a line.

Announcements

Read about the Five Trends Pedaling Bikeshare Forward
Bikesharing services debuted in the US in 2010. Since then, they’ve expanded to include dockless, adaptive, and electric, pedal-assist varieties. But in 2017, another two-wheeled transportation device appeared on the block and skyrocketed in use—e-scooters. In this new blog post, SUMC looks at the major trends influencing the future of bikeshare.
Visit the blog.

New on the MOD Learning Center: Rural and Small Town Transportation
Shared mobility is only for cities, right? Wrong. While it’s true that small towns and rural areas don’t have the same access to multiple public transportation options as more densely populated urban environments, the public and private sectors are collaborating on ways to leverage emerging technology and service models to improve mobility options. In this new MOD Learning Center module, SUMC breaks down the policies, programs, and planning around rural transportation in the US. Learn more on the MOD Learning Center.

Non-SUMC Events

Attend the first meeting of the Chicagoland Bike Sharing Forum
Join regional bicycle and transportation advocates on Monday, October 21, 2019, from 10:00 am until 12:00 pm at the Kane County Government Center. The forum is an opportunity for current and prospective bikeshare stakeholders to discuss the variety of topics surrounding this ever-changing technology.
Learn more and register.


Ridehailing/Carsharing/Carpooling

The city council of El Monte, CA, unanimously voted to draft a law that would guarantee a $30-an-hour wage for ridehail drivers—essentially double the minimum wage in LA County.

GeekWire investigates the shutdown of BMW’s now-defunct ReachNow carsharing service in Seattle and Portland and how the recent Daimler-BMW joint venture had a hand in its demise.

Lyft has more plans to expand across Canada with Vancouver as its next target city.

VIDEO: Grist set out to see what mode (or combination of modes) would be fastest to get from downtown Seattle out to Seward Park. Did transit come out on top? Did ridehailing steal first? (Hint: it’s a little bit of both.)

Partnerships and Programs

Uber Health, the company’s initiative for non-emergency medical transportation, is partnering with American Logistics for more integrated healthcare transportation management and paratransit mobility in one unified platform.

According to a new study about statewide congestion from MassDOT, Boston is seeing some of the worst traffic around the country, and it looks like roads will stay car-choked if single-occupancy driving doesn’t decrease. Luckily, the agency has plans to boost transit service, encourage telecommuting, and fund more bus/rail infrastructure to kick the trend.

In their latest guide, the National League of Cities calls for more cities to consider congestion pricing to keep traffic low and create safer/cleaner communities. We agree.

Michigan’s SMART transit system donated a 32-foot bus to the Dearborn Heights Parks and Recreation Department to help seniors and riders with disabilities live independent lives by scheduling trips to cultural and community-based events—for free.

Bikesharing and Micromobility

Metro bikeshare has launched in North Hollywood with 150 bikes at 16 stations near the Orange and Red Line stations for better multimodal connections with transit.

How are dockless mobility, transit, and active transportation access impacted by equity goals in the DC region? Greater Greater Washington joined We Act Radio, Bird, and the District DOT, along with local community organizations, for a panel to discuss just that.

Atlanta has enacted a nighttime ban on electric scooters between 9 pm and 4 am after a series of accidents, almost all involving cars. No actions were taken against the automobiles.

Detroit’s MoGo bikeshare system is adding 50 new pedal-assist e-bikes to its fleet: great for longer trips, hilly terrain, and commutes.

Transit

The Koch brothers are at it again with dark-money campaigns to push anti-transit messaging, and this time its in Phoenix in the form of Proposition 105 to stop light rail development in the city’s South side.

Learn about LA Metro’s Office of Extraordinary Innovation and how its approach to transit and mobility technology are making it easier to live in LA without a car.

Caltrain in San Francisco wants to offer a “BART-like service” with a proposed expansion plan that would have trains showing up every 15 minutes, ideally boosting daily ridership from 65,000 to 180,000.

Check out this guide from Curbed on eight public prairie lands, forest preserves, streams, and lagoons that are accessible by public transit in the Greater Chicago area.

Technology

Google Maps wants to give you better walking directions by using augmented reality to overlay arrows and provide intuitive navigation in real time. It’s in beta everywhere Street View is available.

Street Story is a free online platform that allows anyone to contribute, collect, and analyze street design information in their communities. Streetsblog covers how this powerful tool is helping community groups and public agencies dissect the high rate of bike and pedestrian accidents happening around Humboldt County, CA.

Self-driving shuttle programs are kicking it into high gear around the US. Optimus Ride has started giving autonomous rides to ferry commuters at Brooklyn Navy Yard, and two companies are forming a partnership to offer “autonomous modular solutions” to help turn human-operated vehicles into self-driving versions.

MIT’s SENSEable City Lab and the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions want to use autonomous boats to ferry people across waterways so that larger fixed-route boats can get through without building a tall, expensive bridge.

Urban Sustainability

You can’t picture the prototypical American city without including multi-level parking garages dotting city streets, but now these auto-centric monoliths are being repurposed into modern apartment complexes while new structures are being built with a mixed-use retrofit in mind.

New York is going to make a part of Manhattan’s busy 14th Street almost completely off-limits to cars (save for deliveries, and drop-offs/pick-ups), a bold step to address the automobile’s role in congestion, pollution, and low public-transit ridership.

Climate Change and Land, a new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, focuses on agriculture and conservation with an underlying idea we stand behind: to limit the negative consequences of unsustainable land management we need to stop cities from sprawling.

Glide past the taxis, TNCs, and traffic-stuck cars and take a bike ride to the airport. At least that’s what Bike Snob did as he details his trip to La Guardia while wondering why airports don’t make it easier for the traveling cyclist.

Requests for Proposals, Qualifications, or Information

RFP: Forty-Foot (40’) Zero Emission Electric Buses
Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation (IndyGo)
Indianapolis, Indiana
Deadline: September 3, 2019

RFP: Accessible Mobility on Demand
Sound Transit
Seattle, Washington
Deadline: September 27, 2019

RFP: Transit District Development Opportunity
City of White Plains
White Plains, New York
Deadline: November 1, 2019

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Scooters, scooters, everywhere. But what about the bikes? Five trends framing the future of micromobility https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/scooters-scooters-everywhere-but-what-about-the-bikes-five-trends-framing-the-future-of-micromobility/ Wed, 14 Aug 2019 18:56:22 +0000 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/?p=9329 According to Bloomberg, electric scooter mania is taking over cities. CityLab dubbed 2018 the “Year of the Scooter.” And from Providence, RI to Portland, OR e-scooter pilots have been popping...

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According to Bloomberg, electric scooter mania is taking over cities. CityLab dubbed 2018 the “Year of the Scooter.” And from Providence, RI to Portland, OR e-scooter pilots have been popping up seemingly daily.

But in the face of the e-scooter boom, what’s going on with bikesharing—the original micromobility? How are bikeshare systems evolving with changing demand? In a multimodal network, will the modes complement each other, or compete, or some of both? Below are five major trends SUMC sees as emerging in the bikeshare market in 2019.

While dockless bike systems in smaller markets have largely been replaced by e-scooters, many of the largest docked systems are benefitting from greater investments and network expansion

While some cities, like Seattle and Orlando, are still home to dockless bikeshare systems or markets, many dockless operators have shifted their attention to e-scooters, which appeal to providers because they’re cheaper to manufacture and easier to rebalance. For example, Lime (which tellingly dropped the “Bike” from its name in mid-2018) pulled its green dockless bikes off the streets in a number of markets in early 2019 in favor of their e-scooter fleets. This left several cities, including St. Louis and Rockford, IL, without a bikeshare program at all.

Despite this shift away from dockless bikes to e-scooters, cities with large docked bike programs are leaning into their established systems. For example, New York’s Citi Bike announced this summer that it plans to nearly quadruple its existing 12,000-bike fleet to 40,000 bikes and double its coverage by 2023, including large expansions into the Bronx and Queens. Similarly, Chicago’s docked system is expanding to all 50 of the city’s wards in the next three years, and the DC region’s Capital Bikeshare added a seventh local jurisdiction to its system in May 2019.

However, while the docked systems in America’s largest cities are expanding, it remains unclear if the trend will be mirrored in smaller cities. Because of the large capital investment required for a widespread docked system, it is possible that dockless bikes—or perhaps the popular e-scooters—will emerge as the option best suited for smaller markets. Another possibility is that more cities will follow the lead of the Twin Cities’ Nice Ride MN and pursue hybrid bikeshare systems, using both physical and virtual docks, with the system becoming increasingly dockless as equipment reaches the end of its life cycle.

E-bikes and adaptive bikes are on the upswing   

Many systems are also expanding the types of bikes they offer. Bikeshare operating giant Motivate (acquired by Lyft in 2018) has promised to incorporate e-bikes in its markets, and already began to roll out a new generation of hybrid e-bikes despite recalling over 3,000 e-bikes in April 2019 due to safety concerns. The company has made it clear that it envisions transitioning much of its existing fleets to e-bikes in the coming years.

Similarly, the fleets of the vendors participating in Seattle’s dockless bikeshare pilot (Jump, Lime, and Lyft) consist entirely of e-bikes. They are overwhelmingly popular, particularly among commuters who want to bike to work without showing up sweaty, as the electric motor helps riders travel with less effort. In hilly areas like Puget Sound, the electric assist also makes biking a more viable choice for all kinds of trips for travelers at a variety of fitness levels. In cities like Madison, WI, and Fort Worth, TX, that have added e-bikes to their fleets in recent months, ridership has increased significantly.

The disabled community has also successfully pushed for bikeshare systems to incorporate adaptive bikes. These bikes, which include hand-powered, easy-balance, and tandem, help people with physical limitations take part in local bikeshare systems. Detroit , Oakland, and Portland have already launched adaptive programs, and Chicago’s new agreement with Lyft/Motivate requires that the operator incorporate an adaptive program within the next few years.

Bikeshare is becoming more deeply embedded in communities

Across the country, cities are integrating bikeshare with existing transit services, reinforcing bikesharing’s role as part of the public transit system. Portland, OR, now allows individuals to purchase a bundled “transportation wallet” that provides transit passes and bikeshare access at a steep discount versus purchasing the services separately. Pittsburgh is encouraging residents to use bikeshare to connect to transit trips by offering 15 minutes of free bikeshare for transit riders. Residents can simply use their public transit farecard to unlock a bike from the local “Healthy Ride” system.

Another trend revolves around markets typically not courted by bikeshare operators. Small and rural communities’ lower population density often makes implementing a fiscally sustainable microtransit program significantly more challenging. Because these smaller communities have different mobility needs and resources at their disposal, they are establishing their own bikeshare systems. Towns such as Pocahontas, IA, and Brusly, LA, are finding that, by owning and operating their own small fleets of shared bikes (instead of contracting operations out to a more expensive private party), they too can offer their residents bikeshare as a mobility option.

Markets are defining different operational models for different types of communities

When launching a bikeshare program, cities must consider local conditions and community needs, including density, geography and weather, potential bikeshare ridership, and infrastructure to support safe biking in general. However, the most central question for most cities is: how should we manage our bikeshare system? Should we select a single vendor or issue permits to multiple vendors, and how much are we willing to invest ourselves? Patterns are emerging that suggest that certain system models are better suited to certain community types.

Public-private partnership (P3): Some of the largest bikeshare systems in the U.S. are managed by a P3, where city departments (which can access different funding and financing sources than private companies) can share the burden of the significant up-front capital investment needed to launch a large-scale system. With a designated P3, the city has committed private sector involvement, and the selected operator can utilize their private-sector expertise while leveraging support from the supervising public agency. Cities like New York City and Chicago use the P3 model for their docked systems. These systems often benefit from advertising and sponsorships to further offset public costs and user fees.

Privately owned and operated: A private model can be one in which a city grants one vendor an exclusive right to operate in a community, or it can be one in which the city grants an operating permit to one or multiple qualifying vendors. With a permit model, a city allows a dockless bicycle provider to operate on their streets, charging companies a per-bike or annual fee (or both) and setting guidelines on where and how vendors can operate. The benefit of such a model is that there is no investment required on the part of the city beyond the cost of administering the program; the risk, however, is that the city has no commitment from operators to remain in the market, as communities like Saint Louis, Saint Paul, and many others experienced when Lime withdrew its bikes.

While the crest of the dockless wave has passed, and many dockless bikeshare operations have given way to e-scooters, a few cities with a strong biking market (such as in Seattle) have kept their dockless programs. For most cities, however, some degree of investment—such as in branding and geocoding traditional bike racks or parking zones—may be needed to support a permitted dockless or hybrid bikeshare operator going forward. Exclusively issuing permits for operation without any city investment has primarily become the domain of e-scooters.

Interestingly, some cities (such as Washington D.C.New York City and Chicago) have experimented with permitting private dockless programs to operate in conjunction with their public docked systems, but as a 2019 lawsuit in San Francisco can attest, this can be a tricky endeavor.

Non-profits: It is increasingly common among bikeshare systems for a local non-profit to “own” the system. In cities like Denver, CO and Philadelphia, PA, a non-profit contracts with a private operator to manage the bikeshare system. Because the bikeshare is not a city program, the city does not have to invest capital, but neither does it receive any revenue from the program. In most cases, the city does provide subsidies or sponsorships. The risk with such a model is that the program’s funding relies on grants and gifts. Nevertheless, it is used across the country for systems of all sizes, and for both docked and dockless bike programs.

City-operated leased bikes: This emerging model is one used almost exclusively by small and rural communities. For example, the Iowa-based company Koloni works specifically with small towns to bring city-owned bikeshare systems to them. In these markets, the city—not the company—is responsible for operating the bikeshare system; Koloni rents the bikes to the city for a monthly fee, which also includes use of the online platform for locating and paying for bikes. This model is typically used for very small dockless or hybrid systems, since the smaller communities willing to balance and repair their own fleets are rarely interested in investing the capital needed for a docked system.

Feds are starting to catch up to bikeshare’s benefits

As bikeshare grows in value around the country, many communities’ members of Congress have taken greater steps to support it. A House bill introduced in July would make some federal transit funds available to bikeshare programs, a huge step in recognizing bikeshare as an important and valid component of a transportation network. Another Senate bill would require that 5% of each state’s Federal highway funds be allocated to complete streets programs, which would support construction of biking infrastructure. And the $287 billion federal transportation bill released in July, 2019 includes an increase in funding for “Transportation Alternatives” such as biking and walking.

Overall, safe, well-designed infrastructure is key to micromobility use, and this will require expanding or remaking existing paths, roadways, and facilities. Hopefully, more federal legislators will learn to consider biking and walking (and scooting) forms of transportation in themselves, not an “alternative,” so needed investments can be made.

__________

What do these trends indicate? While the hype surrounding scooters may suggest they are the mode of the future, expansions in bikeshare system coverage, the integration of payment options with public transit, and the roll out of electric and adaptive bikes suggest that bikeshare continues to be seen as an important component of any city’s suite of mobility options.

Mobility trends come and go, but SUMC believes that both modes can work together as part of a multimodal network of accessible, affordable, and environmentally sound transportation options. If these trends continue, bikeshare will grow even more deeply embedded in communities and transportation systems in the years to come.

 

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Save the date: 2020 National Shared Mobility Summit https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/save-the-date-2020-national-shared-mobility-summit/ Mon, 12 Aug 2019 17:44:18 +0000 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/?p=9314 The post Save the date: 2020 National Shared Mobility Summit appeared first on Shared-Use Mobility Center.

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The date you’ve been waiting for is here!

2020 National Shared Mobility Summit

March 17-19, 2020

Hyatt Regency McCormick Place, Chicago, IL

Mark your calendars for the Shared Mobility Summit of the year. And the location isn’t all that’s new and exciting. Stay tuned!

If you have an questions about the 2020 Summit, please email summit2020@sharedusemobilitycenter.org.

In the meantime, check out some coverage of last year’s Summit through SUMC’s Ten Insights from the event’s sessions and our Executive Director Sharon Feigon’s Top Ten Summit Takeaways.

The post Save the date: 2020 National Shared Mobility Summit appeared first on Shared-Use Mobility Center.

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Mobility Hub Newsletter: August 7, 2019 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/mobility-hub-newsletter-august-7-2019/ Wed, 07 Aug 2019 20:18:37 +0000 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/?p=9302 The post Mobility Hub Newsletter: August 7, 2019 appeared first on Shared-Use Mobility Center.

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Welcome to the Shared-Use Mobility Center’s weekly guide to the most impactful news, thought-provoking articles and innovative technologies that are shaping our transportation future. We believe in sharing information, just like sharing cars, bikes, and scooters, so if there’s anything additional you’d like to see, just drop us a line.

Announcements

The date you’ve been waiting for is here!

2020 National Shared Mobility Summit
March 17-19, 2020 | Chicago, IL
Hyatt Regency McCormick Place

 

View of Chicago from Hyatt McCormick

Evening view from the Hyatt.

Mark your calendars for the shared mobility summit of the year, held at the place Illinois Meetings and Events Magazine named, “Best Conference or Resort Venue” two years in a row. (2016-17). And the location isn’t all that’s new and exciting. Stay tuned!

Coming in September: Equity in Shared Mobility Services
A new white paper and webinar will explore ways the public and private sectors can improve mobility partnerships to give low-income and transportation disadvantaged communities better access to economic opportunities.


Ridehailing/Carsharing/Carpooling

Ridehailing companies think New York’s rules—limiting cruise time between trips and mandating a minimum driver pay—are limiting their ability to operate properly, but city officials say the policies are working in favor of drivers and riders. (And lowering emissions might add.)

Via expands its ridehailing service throughout Chicago and will offer $2.50 rides to and from 65 Metra and CTA transit stations.

Lyft has a new program that will provide veterans with free rides to career, housing, and food assistance programs in San Antonio.

EVs on the rise! Zipcar UK reports that 22,000 carsharing members have used an electric vehicle from the company’s fleet since July 2018.

Partnerships and Programs

The Detroit Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation were awarded $2.6 million in FTA grants to add electric buses and charging infrastructure, with help from DTE energy and EV bus manufacturer Proterra.

Masabi and Fort Collins, CO are launching an account-based fare system and mobile barcode e-tickets for the city’s transit system to speed up boarding and reduce wait times. Efficient and convenient.

A new bus program from the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority, in partnership with the Health Forward Foundation, will give free rides to ten nonprofits in the region, a first-of-its-kind program in the nation.

EV tech company WAVE will provide wireless inductive charging systems to the Antelope Valley Transit Authority in Northern LA as the agency transitions to an all-electric bus fleet.

Bikesharing and Micromobility

As Divvy gears up to launch pedal-assist e-bikes in Chicago’s South Side, residents were able to try them out at community outreach events and in organized rides.

Not exactly “carbon-free” but getting there. The Conversation looks at the environmental impact of electric dockless scooters and what it would take for them to be a “net win” for the environment.

Electric mopeds look to be the next micromobility program coming to the DC area as the District DOT announces a four-month pilot for hundreds of the EV motorized vehicle.

According to a new report, a total of 65,124 miles were taken on dockless Lime scooters in Chicago since June 15th with a median distance of 1.1 miles.

Transit

New York’s MTA and Partnership for New York City will be working with six companies to test innovations in public transportation and mobility with the newly formed Transit Tech Lab, with subway and bus improvements as the focus.

A massive regional transportation plan in Maryland wants to improve public transit in Baltimore City and County, Anne Arundel County, Harford County, and Howard County by focusing on service reliability and the needs of all types of riders.

Boston wants the allure of public-private partnerships and big development to fuel interest in connecting the city’s North and South Stations for a more seamless regional transit system.

Pigeon Forge, TN, which has the second-largest rural transit system in the US., had a record-breaking year with a whopping 3.1 million passengers for the 2018-19 season.

Technology

Tap and go, all from your wrist. LA Metro just launched a new TAP wristbandthat stores transit values and passes. You can use it at all Metro validators, gates and fare boxes.

What’s the deal with air taxis? Bloomberg takes a look at how they have come into the public realm and what it’s going to take before we see them in our cities.

French autonomous tech company Navya is stepping away from its AV shuttles and pivoting to developing systems for 3rd party customers.

The auto industry has a vision for cities with autonomous vehicles. But with its auto-centric focus that treats cyclists, pedestrians and bus riders as second-class citizens, it looks pretty dystopian.

Urban Sustainability

“Who is the street for?” Sidewalk Labs dives into the age-old battle around street space in the US and how priorities shifted from pedestrian-friendly thoroughfares to car-clogged roadways—with complete streets as a way back.

The Northeast and Mid-Atlantic have made bold commitments to fight climate change with regional climate policies to curb transportation emissions, but will those policies keep equity in mind to help the transit-underserved and pollution-laden neighborhoods?

Racial segregation has been a major determinant in limiting housing opportunity among marginalized communities in Seattle, but researchers have been using personal “navigators” and neighborhood data to help families find high-opportunity areas for a better quality of life.

Los Angeles is officially kicking the Level of Service metric to the curb and has already started measuring Vehicle Miles Traveled to better frame the issues around traffic congestion to mitigate environmental impacts.

Requests for Proposals, Qualifications, or Information

RFP: Assist in the creation of a Public Transportation Agency Safety Plan
Chattanooga Area Regional Transportation
Chattanooga, Tennessee
August 22, 2019
E-mail: anniepowell@gocarta.org

RFP: Forty-Foot (40’) Zero Emission Electric Buses
Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation (IndyGo)
Indianapolis, Indiana
Deadline: September 3, 2019

RFP: Transit District Development Opportunity
City of White Plains
White Plains, NY
Deadline: Friday, November 1, 2019

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Mobility Hub Newsletter: August 1, 2019 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/mobility-hub-newsletter-august-1-2019/ Thu, 01 Aug 2019 14:00:21 +0000 https://sharedusemobilitycenter.org/?p=9292 The post Mobility Hub Newsletter: August 1, 2019 appeared first on Shared-Use Mobility Center.

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Welcome to the Shared-Use Mobility Center’s weekly guide to the most impactful news, thought-provoking articles and innovative technologies that are shaping our transportation future. We believe in sharing information, just like sharing cars, bikes, and scooters, so if there’s anything additional you’d like to see, just drop us a line.

Announcements

SUMC Summer in Chicago Open House
August 1, 2019 | 5 – 7 PM
Join us at the Connectory in the historic Merchandise Mart for our first open house in our new digs. You’ll be treated to exclusive presentations by the City of Chicago and Via, and get the chance to network with mobility movers and shakers.
  • SUMC Executive Director Sharon Feigon will open and share SUMC news.
  • Kevin O’Malley from the City of Chicago will talk about the scooter and Car2Go pilots.
  • John Criezis from Via will talk about the service’s plans in the Windy City.

RSVP today!

MOD Learning Center Feature:
Learn how the right regulations can advance mobility for all.

This case study by the Frontier Group in coordination with the Shared-Use Mobility Center shows how smart rules and regulations can position a pilot to be used to its fullest potential—for everyone. See how Seattle used forward-thinking policies around dockless bikesharing to give more residents a sustainable mobility option on the MOD Learning Center.
Requires login or register for a free account.
Connexion Mobility is right around the corner
August 8, 2019 | 9:00 AM – 6:00 PM (Central)
Chicago Connectory Hear SUMC Executive Director Sharon Feigon & Strategy/Policy Director Ellen Partridge speak at the Connectory’s Connexion Mobility, a full-day event focused on the new mobility world and the cities, communities, technology, and mobility options that are shaping it. Refreshments provided. Register here.

Ridehailing/Carsharing/Carpooling

Lyft has a new six-month pilot in Seattle that offers free trips to help the homeless access emergency shelter services.

A new MBTA study on TNCs in Boston estimates that ridehailing has taken away about $20 million each year of fares from the agency. Lyft and Uber have pushed back, saying the report doesn’t look at the whole picture.

Kids-only ridehailing service HopSkipDrive just launched in Phoenix, making it easier for parents to get their kids to after-school activities on busy workdays.

Southeast Asian ridehail giant Grab is setting its sights on the emerging mobility industry in Indonesia with $2 billion through a recent investment from Japan’s Softbank.

Partnerships and Programs

A recently-announced bill Congress, named America’s Transportation Infrastructure Act of 2019, calls for $287 billion over five years for road and bridge upgrades with $3 billion allotted to “lower highway-related carbon emissions” and another $1 billion for “alternative-fuel infrastructure.” It’s a start.

Check out the list of winners for the 2019 AARP Community Challenge which awarded $1.6 million to 159 quick-action projects from across the country, including ones that covered walkability, bikeability, access to public/private transit, and creating vibrant public spaces.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot has big plans to make the city “the most accessible in the nation”, installing up to 100 traffic beeps or vibrations for the visually impaired. But from ramps on streets and sidewalks to working elevators in CTA stations, there is a long, expensive road ahead.

A one-cent regional sales tax is set to join the November 2020 ballot in the Bay Area to fund $100 billion in transportation projects.

Bikesharing and Micromobility

One step forward for multimodal transit in Chicago—the Transit app now supports trip planning and booking with dockless scooter options. They join Divvy, the city’s bikeshare program, public transit, and ride-hailing services.

A plus for shared mobility policy: lawmakers want to change federal laws to allow bikeshare programs to be eligible for federal transit funds with a new proposed bill.

Shared scooters flooded the streets of San Diego just over a year ago with applause and criticisms. Now Bird and Lime are in a tough legal battle with local impounding service ScootScoop, the “Repo Men” of dockless scooters.

What happened to all of the dockless bikes that once blanketed many US cities? Hundreds at least are being donated to nonprofits that help get people cycling.

Transit

Via is working with Fort Worth, TX’ Trinity Metro to offer first/last mile trips to Mercantile Center Station with a new on-demand shuttle service through the Trinity Metro ZIPZONE app.

Transit tech company TransLoc also has a new on-demand shuttle service with Antioch, CA’s Tri Delta Transit offering app-based trips to the Antioch and Pittsburg Bay Point BART Stations through a 6-month pilot.

Take a look through Chicago transit history as Chicago Mag highlights the upbeat cartoons and art of Ferdinand Himmelsbach, the man behind nearly 30 years of illustrations for CTA’s employee magazine.

When the means becomes the end. National Geographic lists ten public transit stations from around the world that feature “striking architecture, historic sites, and surprising views”, making them perfect travel destinations.

Technology

AVs will transform our regions, opening doors for parks not parking lots, and the chance for unheard-of sprawl. One way control their impact is to look at the auto industry’s past makes.

Public and open! Lyft is releasing its data on autonomous technology to the public in a move to accelerate the development of self-driving vehicles, one of the largest public data sets of its kind.

Alphabet’s self-driving arm Waymo and its AI division DeepMind are using a machine-learning technique called population-based training to fine-tune autonomous vehicle algorithms for the best driverless technology.

VIDEO: The future of self-driving might be closer than you think with options already out in the public from the Lyft-Aptiv partnership and Tesla, but some drivers have their doubts. CBS Sunday Morning explores.

Urban Sustainability

Ford, Volkswagen, Honda, and BMW are going to follow California’s own auto emissions standards (smart) in the face of the Trump administration’s plan to roll them back.

Three surprisingly bipartisan bills join recent measures from the House and Senate for a proposed carbon tax in the US to help invest for clean energy initiatives and reduce energy-related carbon pollution.

The Democratic candidates are facing off for a series of debates for the 2020 US election, and Curbed has put together a guide to show where some of them stand on housing, infrastructure, climate change, and transportation.

The US is synonymous with spread-out, car-focused transportation—with a history of 3.6 million deaths since 1899 and escalating pollution problems to show for it. In this light, the New Yorker asks, “Was it all a mistake?”

Requests for Proposals, Qualifications, or Information

RFP: Mobile Fare Payment & Trip Planning
Metropolitan Tulsa Transit Authority
Tulsa, Oklahoma
August 09, 2019

RFP: Silver Line Transit Oriented Development and Multi-Modal Planning Study
Interurban Transit Partnership – The Rapid
Grand Rapids, Michigan
August 12, 2019

RFI: JTA Integrated Mobility Application
Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Jacksonville, Florida
August 16, 2019

RFP: Assist in the Creation of a Public Transportation Agency Safety Plan
Chattanooga Area Regional Transportation
Chattanooga, Tennessee
August 22, 2019, 02:00 PM
E-mail: anniepowell@gocarta.org

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The post Mobility Hub Newsletter: August 1, 2019 appeared first on Shared-Use Mobility Center.

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